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sM    SuperMatter

PROJECT DATA
TYPE SCULPTURE 
FABRICATION
LOCATION ANN ARBOR
MICHIGAN, USA
CLIENT SELF-INITIATED
DATE 2009 
TEAM DAVE PIGRAM
WES McGEE

PAULIS AUSTRINS
ZACK JACOBSEN-WEAVER
IAIN MAXWELL
BRANDON CLIFFORD
EXHIBITIONS VENICE ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE
ITALY, 2012
DIGITAL PRIMITIVES,
EXPERIMENTA DESIGN EXPO
LISBON, 2009
WILD CHILD, BRIDGE GALLERY
NEW YORK CITY, 2009
COMPOTEC
TURIN, ITALY, 2009
LOT GALLERY
LEXINGTON, 2009
ROUSE DETROIT, 555 GALLERY
DETROIT, 2009

SuperMatter

Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA


sM


Through the innovative adoption of 3D printing technologies, we extend the traditions of lost-wax casting to produce highly intricate and unique bronze forms. 




SuperMatter consists of two sculptural artefacts materialised in bronze and an infinite catalogue of algorithmically generated digital possibilities. The work is created via a custom written genotype formation algorithm written in VBScript. As such, although both sculptures share the same underlying DNA and indeed many formal similarities, their outward form is ultimately unique as a result of epigenetic differences. The two pieces are non-identical twins.

In realising the bronze sculptures, the highly intricate and detailed digital forms are first materialised using a high-resolution Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) 3D printer. Subsequently, these positive forms are converted using more traditional lost-wax techniques into molds ready for casting. The workflow offers a viable, if not still laborious, process for capturing the unique forms of each artefact. The plinths above which the objects are embedded, are also derived via the genetic code and materialised in laminated timber via CNC (Computer Numerically Controlled) milling.

The sculptures have been exhibited at the Bridge Gallery in New York (2009) and the Venice Architecture Biennale (2012).
Genotype Aggregation Ruleset
Lindenmeyer [L-System] substitution


Genotype Diagram
The L-System substitution ruleset

Fabrication Sequence
A photographic record of the many production steps required to take an intricate 3D printed form, to a lost-form casting mold and finally a finished bronze object.
Plans
#ID034 (Left) #ID036 (Right).
Perspective
#ID036.

Final Sculpture II
#ID034.